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Intro

Coursera: Game Theory II: Advanced Applications

 with  Matthew Jackson, Kevin Leyton-Brown and Yoav Shoham
Popularized by movies such as "A Beautiful Mind", game theory is the mathematical modeling of strategic interaction among rational (and irrational) agents. Over four weeks of lectures, this advanced course considers how to design interactions between agents in order to achieve good social outcomes. Three main topics are covered: social choice theory (i.e., collective decision making and voting systems), mechanism design, and auctions.

In the first week we consider the problem of aggregating different agents' preferences, discussing voting rules and the challenges faced in collective decision making. We present some of the most important theoretical results in the area: notably, Arrow's Theorem, which proves that there is no "perfect" voting system, and also the Gibbard-Satterthwaite and Muller-Satterthwaite Theorems. We move on to consider the problem of making collective decisions when agents are self interested and can strategically misreport their preferences. We explain "mechanism design" -- a broad framework for designing interactions between self-interested agents -- and give some key theoretical results. Our third week focuses on the problem of designing mechanisms to maximize aggregate happiness across agents, and presents the powerful family of Vickrey-Clarke-Groves mechanisms. The course wraps up with a fourth week that considers the problem of allocating scarce resources among self-interested agents, and that provides an introduction to auction theory.

You can find a full syllabus and description of the course here: http://web.stanford.edu/~jacksonm/GTOC-II-Syllabus.html

There is also a predecessor course to this one, for those who want to learn or remind themselves of the basic concepts of game theory: https://www.coursera.org/learn/game-theory-1

An intro video can be found here: http://web.stanford.edu/~jacksonm/Game-Theory-2-Intro.mp4

Syllabus

Social Choice
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Mechanism Design
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Efficient Mechanisms
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Auctions
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Final Exam
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10 Student
reviews
Cost Free Online Course (Audit)
Subject Economics
Institution Stanford University
Provider Coursera
Language English
Certificates Paid Certificate Available
Hours 5-7 hours a week
Calendar 5 weeks long
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Reviews for Coursera's Game Theory II: Advanced Applications
4.4 Based on 10 reviews

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5.0 2 years ago
by Zach is taking this course right now, spending 4 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be hard.
This course is certainly very interesting, but it's also quite challenging. The class forums seem to be active with quite a few confused people. The content is very full-on mathsy rather than being a dumbed down version. While it recommends completing a precursor course it doesn't seem to be absolutely necessary: they usually redefine the most important terms.
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4.0 2 years ago
Zoltan Sánchez dropped this course, spending 8 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be very hard.
The course is great but quite challenging.

The description is true "ADVANCE Game Theory".

I dropped cause I was expecting a more descriptive course and less demostrations, so I didnt'have the requiered time to follow the course.

You have to study and invest significant time.
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5.0 11 months ago
Jörg completed this course.
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4.0 2 years ago
by Paweł Klimczuk completed this course.
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Morris Qiu completed this course.
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by Paulius D completed this course.
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4.0 a year ago
by Tianpei Xie completed this course.
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4.0 2 years ago
by Colin Khein completed this course.
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5.0 11 months ago
by Matt Herich completed this course.
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3.0 4 years ago
劉 伯仲 dropped this course.
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