subject
Intro

Coursera: Pre-Calculus: Trigonometry

 with  Sarah Eichhorn and Rachel Lehman
This course covers mathematical topics in trigonometry. Trigonometry is the study of triangle angles and lengths, but trigonometric functions have far reaching applications beyond simple studies of triangles. This course is designed to help prepare students to enroll for a first semester course in single variable calculus.

Upon completing this course, you will be able to:
1. Evaluate trigonometric functions using the unit circle and right triangle approaches
2. Solve trigonometric equations
3. Verify trigonometric identities
4. Prove and use basic trigonometric identities.
5. Manipulate trigonometric expressions using standard identities
6. Solve right triangles
7. Apply the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines

Syllabus

Introduction to Trigonometry
In this module, you will get an overview of the course and the foundations of trigonometry. We will also begin exploring angles and different systems for angle measure.

The Unit Circle and Solving Right Triangles
In this module, we will explore circles and right triangles. We will see several special angles related to particular right triangles and we will learn how to find measurements of sides and angles in right triangles using trigonometric functions.

Properties of Trigonometric Functions
In this module we will explore several properties of trigonometric functions and discover how to compute values of these functions given information about an angle or a unit circle point.

Inverse Trigonometric Functions
We will now explore the inverse trigonometric functions. These are useful to go backwards - we will seek to find the angles which produce a given value of a trigonometric function.

Basic Trigonometric Identities I
There are several useful trigonometric identities which allow us to simplify trigonometric expressions and find values for the trigonometric functions beyond the special angles. We will begin by exploring the sum and difference identities. Warning: Generally, sin(x+y) does NOT equal sin(x)+sin(y)!!!

Basic Trigonometric Identities II
In this module, we continue our exploration of trigonometric function identities. We will begin by learning how to verify such identities. We will then talk about the double-angle and half-angle identities.

Trigonometric Equations
In this module, we will focus on solving equations involving trigonometric functions. These are usually equations in which the variable appears inside of a trigonometric function and we must use a combination of algebra skills and trigonometry manipulation to solve.

Law of Sines and Law of Cosines
The Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines give useful properties of the trigonometry functions that can help us solve for unknown angles and sides in oblique (non-right angle) triangles. We will focus on utilizing those laws in solving triangles, including those which arise in word problems.

Trigonometry Final Exam
We have completed the new content for the course. In this final module, you will review and practice the topics covered throughout the course. You will end by taking the comprehensive final exam.

4 Student
reviews
Cost Free Online Course (Audit)
Pace Upcoming
Subject Calculus
Provider Coursera
Language English
Certificates Paid Certificate Available
Hours 10-12 hours a week
Calendar 9 weeks long
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Reviews for Coursera's Pre-Calculus: Trigonometry
4.5 Based on 4 reviews

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5.0 3 years ago
by Emma Abbott audited this course, spending 10 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be hard.
This course is college level - students will need to have a good background in algebra to get the best out of this one. I found the notation for entering equations a bit of a challenge to get my head around, if you are even one digit off it will mark you wrong. The lecture videos are good though, quite engaging even with a bit of So-Cal accent:)
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3.0 2 months ago
by Salvador Pio Alonday is taking this course right now, spending 10 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be hard.
What makes this course hard are the readings (Precalculus by Stitz and Zeager). The lectures are easy to understand (especially once you're done with the readings for the week; the difficulty of lecture content is A LOT easier than the readings) and the quizzes are easy too. Don't get me wrong, the book is good (and I thank this course for introducing me to a good quality open-source book such as this), it's just that sometimes readings are assigned that tackle topics which have not been discussed yet (or will never be discussed), or which appear in a reading that will be assigned in a later week (in particular, I'm thinking about question 1-h in Example 10.6.1, which is included in Week 4 readings). I would find myself feeling frustrated whenever unfamiliar words pile up. Moreover, the lecturer doesn't inform you about these things; you're just left to wonder if there's a prerequisite that you missed, or if it's okay to not worry about these things because you will learn them later or
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What makes this course hard are the readings (Precalculus by Stitz and Zeager). The lectures are easy to understand (especially once you're done with the readings for the week; the difficulty of lecture content is A LOT easier than the readings) and the quizzes are easy too. Don't get me wrong, the book is good (and I thank this course for introducing me to a good quality open-source book such as this), it's just that sometimes readings are assigned that tackle topics which have not been discussed yet (or will never be discussed), or which appear in a reading that will be assigned in a later week (in particular, I'm thinking about question 1-h in Example 10.6.1, which is included in Week 4 readings). I would find myself feeling frustrated whenever unfamiliar words pile up. Moreover, the lecturer doesn't inform you about these things; you're just left to wonder if there's a prerequisite that you missed, or if it's okay to not worry about these things because you will learn them later or they're outside the scope of the course. I suspect the book would be a more enjoyable read if I had the time to read it from start to finish (or at least roughly from start to finish).
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5.0 2 years ago
Kostis Papadantonakis completed this course.
0 person found
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5.0 2 years ago
Francisco Javier Jiménez completed this course.
0 person found
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