subject
Intro

edX: Justice

 with  Michael J. Sandel
Class Central Course Rank
#3 in Subjects > Social Sciences
#1 in Subjects > Social Sciences > Law

HIGHEST RATED MOOC

This course is a Top 50 MOOC of All Time based on thousands of reviews written by Class Central users. It's guaranteed to be good!

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HarvardX is proud to relaunch this introduction to Justice with new videos and discussion forums in multiple languages!

Taught by lauded Harvard professor Michael Sandel, Justice explores critical analysis of classical and contemporary theories of justice, including discussion of present-day applications. Topics include affirmative action, income distribution, same-sex marriage, the role of markets, debates about rights (human rights and property rights), arguments for and against equality, dilemmas of loyalty in public and private life. The course invites learners to subject their own views on these controversies to critical examination.

The principal readings for the course are texts by Aristotle, John Locke, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, and John Rawls. Other assigned readings include writings by contemporary philosophers, court cases, and articles about political controversies that raise philosophical questions.

Closed Captioning and discussion forums are available in Chinese, German, Portuguese, and Spanish.


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31 Student
reviews
Cost Free Online Course
Pace Upcoming
Subject Law
Institution Harvard University
Provider edX
Language English
Certificates $99 Certificate Available
Calendar 16 weeks long

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31 reviews for edX's Justice

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6 out of 7 people found the following review useful
3 years ago
Diego Riccardi completed this course, spending 5 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be medium.
Very recommended if you care about this topic (who shouldn't care about that?). I'm posting part of the conclusion here, get an idea if you want: "We consider the arguments that are provoked by particular cases. We try to develop the reasons that lead us to go one way rather than another. And then we listen to the Read More
Very recommended if you care about this topic (who shouldn't care about that?). I'm posting part of the conclusion here, get an idea if you want:

"We consider the arguments that are provoked by particular cases.

We try to develop the reasons that lead us to go one

way rather than another.

And then we listen to the reasons of other people.

And sometimes we're persuaded to revise our view.

Other times we're challenged, at least, to shore up and

strengthen our view.

But this is how moral argument proceeds, with justice, and so it

seems to me, also with questions of the good life.

Now, there remains a further worry, and it's a liberal worry.

What about--

if we're going to think of our disagreements about morality and

religion, as bound up with our disagreements about justice, how are

we ever going to find our way to a society that accords respect to fellow

citizens with whom we disagree?

It depends, I think, on which conception of respect one accepts.

On the liberal conception, to respect our fellow citizen's moral and

religious convictions is, so to speak, to ignore them

for political purposes--

To rise above, or abstract from, or to set aside those moral and religious

convictions, to leave them disturbed, to carry out our political debate

without reference to them.

But that isn't the only way, or perhaps even the most plausible way,

of understanding the mutual respect on which democratic life depends.

There is a different conception of respect, according to which we respect

our fellow citizen's moral and religious convictions not by ignoring,

but by engaging them, by attending to them, sometimes by challenging and

contesting them, sometimes by listening and learning from them.

Now, there's no guarantee that a politics of moral and religious

tension and engagement will lead, in any given case, to agreement.

There's no guarantee it will lead even to appreciation for the moral and

religious convictions of others.

It's always possible, after all, that learning more about a religious or a

moral doctrine will lead us to like it less.

But the respect of deliberation and engagement, seems to me a more

adequate, more suitable ideal for a pluralist society.

And to the extent that our moral and religious disagreements reflect some

ultimate plurality of human goods, the politics of moral engagement will

better enable us, so it seems to me, to appreciate the distinctive goods

our different lives express.

When we first came together, some 13 weeks ago, I spoke of the exhilaration

of political philosophy, and also of its dangers.

But how philosophy works, and has always worked, by estranging us from

the familiar, by unsettling our settled assumptions.

And I tried to warn you that once the familiar turns strange, once we begin

to reflect on our circumstance, it's never quite the same again.

I hope you have, by now, experienced at least a little of this unease,

because this is the tension that animates critical reflection, and

political improvement, and maybe even the moral life as well.

And so our argument comes to an end in a sense, but in another sense goes on.

Why, we asked at the outset, why do these arguments keep going, even if

they raise questions that are impossible ever finally to resolve?

The reason is that we live some answer to these questions all the time.

In our public life and in our personal lives, philosophy is inescapable, even

if it sometimes seems impossible.

We began with the thought of Comte, that skepticism is a resting place for

human reason, where it can reflect upon its dogmatic wanderings, but it

is no dwelling place for permanent settlement.

To allow ourselves simply to acquiesce in skepticism or in complacence, Comte

wrote, can never suffice to overcome the restlessness of reason.

The aim of this course has been to awaken the restlessness of reason, and

to see where it might lead.

And if we have done at least that, and if the restlessness continues to

afflict you in the days and years to come, then we together have achieved

no small thing.

Thank you".
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5 out of 5 people found the following review useful
4 years ago
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Anonymous completed this course.
Brilliant course - engaging, challenging, and well-designed. Great discussion on controversial topics like abortion, gay marriage, human rights . Prof. Sandel is very ethical and manages to maintain philosophical rather than political atmosphere in the classroom . The assignments are not too hard and it's allowed to do Read More
Brilliant course - engaging, challenging, and well-designed. Great discussion on controversial topics like abortion, gay marriage, human rights . Prof. Sandel is very ethical and manages to maintain philosophical rather than political atmosphere in the classroom . The assignments are not too hard and it's allowed to do them all in bulk. Highly recommend this course to anybody to become a better thinker, and for personal or professional growth.
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3 out of 3 people found the following review useful
3 years ago
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Jan Stajnko completed this course, spending 2 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be easy.
It is one of the best courses out there. In this course, you will get a great mixture of political philosophy, ethics, moral philosophy and humour. It is worth it even to just watch prof. Sandel's rethorics skills.

Highly advisable for legal students who want to think "out of the box",
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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful
4 years ago
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Anonymous completed this course.
Great course and great teacher! I didn't know there were so many distinct perspectives on justice and the good life. I highly recommend it!
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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful
5 years ago
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Anonymous completed this course.
It is a delight to challenge myself, about moral justice issues and interesting to see what others are saying. I just love it. I love learning, again.
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6 months ago
Dr Morris partially completed this course, spending 6 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be medium.
It was a very interesting course with practical philosophical, ethical, sociological and legal examples that keep. I think The professor thinks he is performing in an amphitheatre with the likes of classical philosophers.
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3 months ago
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Francine is taking this course right now, spending 2 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be medium.
i really liked the way this first class was set up with the prticipation of the students; found it stimulating, toughts provokingand fun at the same time
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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful
3 years ago
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Aana audited this course, spending 3 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be medium.
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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful
3 years ago
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Claire Wagner completed this course, spending 3 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be easy.
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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful
2 years ago
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10 months ago
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