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Intro

FutureLearn: World War 1: Trauma and Memory

 with  Annika Mombauer

2014 marks the centennial year of the beginning of World War 1. The war began in the Balkans, but it soon spread to become a European conflict, and developed into a world war.

It was a war of unprecedented scale and brutality, with countless casualties. It also left a poisonous legacy for the 20th century and beyond, and many of the issues that were left unresolved in 1918 would lead to another world war in 1939. 1914-1918 was a period in history that has proved provocative and culturally resonant for the last hundred years.

On this free online course, you will study the subject of physical and mental trauma, its treatments and its representation. You will focus not only on the trauma experienced by combatants but also the effects of World War 1 on civilian populations.

Over three weeks, you will discover just how devastating the effects of World War 1 were in terms of casualties across the many combatant nations, and look in depth at the problem of “shell shock” and how deeply it affected the lives of those who lived through it. You will also develop the skills to carry out your own independent research.

The war was not only experienced on the battlefield, however, and you’ll explore the many and varied ways in which civilians’ lives were affected by it. For example, in the way combatant casualties affected the lives of loved ones who were left behind.

Finally, you will look at how the trauma of World War 1 has been depicted in art and literature, and see what has been learned from the past in the modern day treatment of combat stress reactions and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

For a taste of what will be covered in this course, read a post from lead educator, Annika Mombauer, on our blog: “Remembrance Sunday: how World War 1 changed the way we mourn the dead.”

This course is part of a series designed in partnership with the BBC to commemorate the war. Using archive material, you will see how representations of trauma have changed over the years.

The other courses in this series are:

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8 Student
reviews
Cost Free Online Course (Audit)
Pace Finished
Subject History
Institution The Open University
Provider FutureLearn
Language English
Certificates Certificate Available
Hours 2 hours a week
Calendar 3 weeks long
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What are MOOCs?
MOOCs stand for Massive Open Online Courses. These are free online courses from universities around the world (eg. Stanford Harvard MIT) offered to anyone with an internet connection.
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8 reviews for FutureLearn's World War 1: Trauma and Memory

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful
3 years ago
Alathea Anderssohn completed this course, spending 5 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be medium.
I spent longer on the course each week than the estimated time because course content lead me to follow up with additional research/viewing of my own. A very thought-provoking course with information about unfamiliar aspects of WW1. However, I had expected something about the way in which memory of WW1 changed over time (and in different countries), and this I did not find in the course.
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2 years ago
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Anonymous completed this course.
The only criticism I have of this course is that at just three weeks long, I would have liked more. The content itself was interesting, informative and t challenged my preconceptions and thinking on a number of occasions. I found that the use of video/audio presentations helped my understanding considerably as did the suggested links that were provided to extend my studies.
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2 years ago
Doris Smith completed this course, spending 2 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be easy.
Frequently sad and even painful. The course made it apparent just how ill-prepared combatant nations were for the consequences and effects of modern war.
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2 years ago
Amanda J Green completed this course.
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2 years ago
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Aana audited this course, spending 3 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be medium.
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2 years ago
Gabriella Volk completed this course.
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2 years ago
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Zeynep K. completed this course.
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3 years ago
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Erika Laurent completed this course, spending 2 hours a week on it and found the course difficulty to be easy.
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