subject

Coursera: Fake News, Facts, and Alternative Facts

 with  Will Potter, Josh Pasek and Brian Weeks
How can you distinguish credible information from “fake news”? Reliable information is at the heart of what makes an effective democracy, yet many people find it harder to differentiate good journalism from propaganda. Increasingly, inaccurate information is shared on Facebook and echoed by a growing number of explicitly partisan news outlets. This becomes more problematic because people have a tendency to accept agreeable messages over challenging claims, even if the former are less objectively credible. In this teach-out, we examine the processes that generate both accurate and inaccurate news stories, and that lead people to believe those stories. We then provide a series of tools that ordinary citizens can use to tell fact from fiction.

A Teach-Out is:

-an event – it takes place over a fixed, short period of time

-an opportunity – it is open for free participation to everyone around the world

-a community – it will be joined by a large number of diverse individuals

-a conversation – an opportunity to give and take ideas and information from people

The University of Michigan Teach-Out Series provides just-in-time community learning events for participants around the world to come together in conversation with the U-M campus community, including faculty experts. The U-M Teach-Out Series is part of our deep commitment to engage the public in exploring and understanding the problems, events, and phenomena most important to society.

Teach-Outs are short learning experiences, each focused on a specific current issue. Attendees will come together over a few days not only to learn about a subject or event but also to gain skills. Teach-Outs are open to the world and are designed to bring together individuals with wide-ranging perspectives in respectful and deep conversation. These events are an opportunity for diverse learners and a multitude of experts to come together to ask questions of one another and explore new solutions to the pressing concerns of our global community. Come, join the conversation!

Find new opportunities at teach-out.org.

Syllabus

Introduction to the Teach-Out


How do We Know Anything?


Journalistic Norms


Types of Inaccurate Information


The Evolving Newsroom


Accuracy in the Digital Era


How to Not Be Conned


Q&A with Will Potter


Conclusion


1 Student
review
Cost Free Online Course (Audit)
Pace Finished
Subject Social Sciences
Provider Coursera
Language English
Calendar 1 weeks long
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1 review for Coursera's Fake News, Facts, and Alternative Facts

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5 days ago
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Anonymous completed this course.
This Fake News course was so obviously actually promoting more Fake News, I gave it a 1 out of 5 stars. Students will finish the course thinking that Fake news is real and real news is Fake! It looks like the basic information of discerning Fake News is completely absent from this course. I would love to have seen at Read More
This Fake News course was so obviously actually promoting more Fake News, I gave it a 1 out of 5 stars. Students will finish the course thinking that Fake news is real and real news is Fake!

It looks like the basic information of discerning Fake News is completely absent from this course. I would love to have seen at least an introductory analysis of the mainstream media, the msm.

http://exonews.org/50-facts-the-world-needs-to-know-about-mainstream-medias-relationship-with-the-us-government/

From the link above:

" • Reasons for the almost universal failure of mainstream journalism, include newsroom sociology, advertising pressure, monopoly ownership, heavy reliance on “official” sources, journalists’ quest for career advancement, professional public relations maneuvers, and the CIA’s continued involvement in the news media to mold thought and opinion."

None of these topics were covered. In fact, it was suggested that we should trust msm by default! I am not kidding! Several times throughout the course we were told to simply trust msm and compare any other alternative sources to the msm, or "reputable" sources such as the NY Times which has a long established history of intentionally incorrect information.

I would like to know more about the background of this teach-out like, who is behind it? Who decided the content? Why do they promote "established sources" like TV and The NY Times, and make smaller, alternative sources appear as unreliable? Who funded this course?

I don't know the answers and may not find out. I suspect since all the real information on Fake News has been ignored, like the bulleted facts above, and the biggest sources of Fake News have been promoted, like TV and the popular newspapers, that it is not to blamed on "ignorance."
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